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72% Say They're Willing to Vote for Woman President

Just 49% Think Most of their Friends Would Do the Same

Survey of 1,000 Adults

April 6-7, 2005 

A Woman President in Next 25 Years?

Very Likely 39%
Somewhat Likely 32%
Not Very Likely 18%
Not at All Likely 8%

RasmussenReports.com


Would you personally be wiling to vote for a woman President?

Yes 72%
No 17%

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What about your family, friends and co-workers…would most of them be willing to vote for a woman President?

Yes 49%
No 22%

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 Will the first woman elected President be politically conservative, moderate, or liberal?

Conservative 25%
Moderate 42%
Liberal 19%

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April 8, 2005--Seventy-two percent (72%) of Americans say they would be willing to vote for a woman President. That figure includes 75% of American women and 68% of men.

However, a Rasmussen Reports survey found that just 49% think most of their family, friends, and co-workers would be willing to vote for a woman to serve as President of the United States.

Among Democrats, 84% say they are willing to vote for a woman, but just 59% think their family, friends, and co-workers would do the same. For Republicans, those numbers are 61% and 41% respectively.

Among those not affiliated with either major party, just 48% believe that most people in their social network would be willing to vote for a woman.

Older Americans are less likely to consider voting for a woman than younger Americans. Among those over 65, just 62% say they'd be willing to vote for a woman. Just 32% think those around them would do the same.

Earlier this year, a Rasmussen Reports survey found that in a match-up between two women, Senator Hillary Clinton leads Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice by a 47% to 40% margin.

Rasmussen Reports has also created the Hillary Meter to track the former First Lady's attempt to create a more centrist image. Currently, 43% of Americans view the former First Lady as politically liberal. That's down from 51% at the end of January.

Among self-identified liberals, 84% say they would be willing to vote for a woman seeking to occupy the Oval Office. Sixty-three percent (63%) say that those around them would do the same.

Forty-three percent (43%) of liberals believe that the first woman elected President will be politically moderate. Thirty-four percent (34%) believe she will be politically liberal.

Among conservatives, 43% expect the first woman President to be from the right side of the political spectrum. Twenty-nine percent (29%) believe she will be politically moderate.

Demographic details are available for Premium Members.

Rasmussen Reports is an electronic publishing firm specializing in the collection, publication, and distribution of public opinion polling information.

Our publications provide real-time information on consumer confidence, investor confidence, employment data, the political situation, and other topics of value and interest. We provide daily updates on the economic confidence of Consumers and Investors. Our consumer data generally identifies trends two to six weeks ahead of traditional consumer confidence measures.

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This survey of 1,000 Adults was conducted by Rasmussen Reports April 6-7, 2005.  The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence.



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